20 November 2015

Britain’s Nature Treasures

Written by Published in Nature
Britain’s Nature Treasures ©Photo by John McSporran

Britain’s flora, fauna and other natural treasures are much most diverse that you’d ever imagine. This season, we curate a small selection of our favourite spots – waiting to be rediscovered

Seven Sisters

sevensistersThere is something monumental and at the same time delicate about chalk cliffs lazily integrating with the sea. These cliffs in East Sussex erode naturally, meaning there is little human interference and therefore tourists can occasionally witness events such as landslides.

Contrary to the name, Seven Sisters are a chain of eight cliffs, the last one created by the aforementioned erosion. Seeing the formation of new cliffs or even being a part of where the land ends and the shallows of the sea begin can lead to true nature katharsis. No wonder the Seven Sisters were in the top 10 of the country’s best coastal walks! Thousands of tourists each year choose the cliffs as their holiday destination, whether it be for a weekend away or a longer break from home.

Unfortunately, transportation to the park is not the easiest for those that want to travel by train and, on top of that, Seven Sisters are located in the South Downs National Park and stretch for a total of 13.8 miles. Even with the breathtaking views, seven hours of walking can leave a few blisters! That’s why car rental companies do their best to be present near National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Some of them, including Hertz, offer electric vehicles, enabling more people to admire natural phenomena the eco-friendly way, including Seven Sisters.

North York Moors

nortyorkmoors

This National Park is known not only for similar chalk cliffs to those found at Seven Sisters, but also for the stunning views and wooded areas. Forests cover around 20% of this landscape, making it a perfect place for those looking for peaceful walks or rides in nature. These woods, as simple as they might sound, are in fact full of secrets. From endangered species and hidden paths to stunning parks whose fame dates back to the medieval times — the North York Moors have more to offer than you can imagine. It is also a perfect option for family gateways as some areas allow dogs and picnicking.

The only downside of visiting national parks is that hotels are often few and far between and camping in the great outdoors is either strictly forbidden or not convenient in colder weather. This is why an increasing number of travel companies, including TravelBird, offer people the chance to go glamping — a more luxurious form of camping yet still close to nature.

Wales & The Red Kite

Red Kite

This bird should be known to every true Welshman, as this rare species and majestic creature is the national animal of Wales. It can be found across Europe, although it generally prefers warmer parts of the continent. Red kites were referred to by Shakespeare in King Lear, oppressed by Scottish King James II, and the population limited to only Welsh territory until the 20th century. Nowadays, the species is spread throughout the whole of the UK and presents a perfect opportunity for people to learn about their habitats and behavior through multiple feeding programmes. Despite their wide wings, the Red Kites’ feet are not strong enough to catch bigger prey. They in turn feed on earthworms and dead animals as they fly closer the ground. Successful reintroduction is under the control of wildlife preservation organisations, for instance the Wildlife Trusts, that work with farmers in order to ensure safe farming practices and, at the same time, eliminating the risk of Red Kites becoming endangered.

Lake District

Lake District

This mountainous region in North East England will amaze everyone, including nature laymen. The National Park covers an area of 885 sqmi and the highest peak reaches almost 1000 metres. The Lake District, as the name suggests, is also rich in lakes and forests and the diversity of the landscape means people can find a wide variety of animals such as red deer, red squirrel and arctic char.

It is known for its U-shaped valleys that were carved by a glacier and is therefore a perfect place for those seeking to escape from the city and wanting to learn kayaking or sailing. If you plan on visiting you will be surprised by the amount or camping or caravanning sites that are available for tourists. Visit Cumbria holds a good selection of them and offers online booking facilities.

 

 

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